Home
Chapter Index
Measuring
standard 
Literature
Navigation

Judgement of nutritional state in Loris

Judgement of the nutritional state and signs of dehydation in Nycticebus pygmaeus

Some measured body weights in N. pygmaeus:

Head-body-length Weight data from literature (no information about time of the year) Normal winter weight Normal summer weight
18.0-21.0 cm 88
21.0-29.0 cm 89
230-287 g (n=7) 86; 300-450 g 87; fully grown more than 500 g38. Female: 372 g; male: 462 g 89 Up to 590, 600 g, in one case 630 g 85(measured at the Endangered Primate Rescue Center, Vietnam)
In summer more slender 85.
(Exact weight?)

Judgement of the nutritional state in Loris

.
 

a-c: normal. d-f: Location and visibility of fat deposits in adipose animals. d: Young male in sleeping posture, with fat deposits visible on the upper thighs and hind parts of the trunk. e: In females, fat deposits are best visible on the ventral side, on either side of the clitoris. In breeding females, some fat deposits may be advantageous; during lactation, in spite of abundant feeding a considerable loss of weight was observed (Meier, unpublished). g-i: signs of emaciation (old animal suffering from kidney disease and diabetes).
 
 

Some body weight data for L. t. nordicus (data by Meier & Schulze, published in Schulze 1998):


 
Sitting height / head-body-
length
Average weight in 1980, freshly caught
Average weight in captivity, 1980-1982
Fat
Emaciated
Normal size
22 cm / 
24.5 - 25 cm
Males 252.3 g 
(n = 4), females 269.7 g 
(n = 5)
Males 277.2 g 
(n = 4),
females 322.5 g
(n = 5)
Males: up to 350 g, females up to 365 g
200 g, 
226 g
Unusually large 
animals
24.5 cm / 
  26 cm
  -  430 - 440 g  Up to 
   482 g, 
 pregnant 
   490 g
  265 g

 

Back to the top of this page
 
Loris and related species: health
Last amendment: 4 February 2001

Home Rescue Centers
Taxonomy, populations
Identification key Distribution maps Database for genera, species & populations
Info for field studies & wild population surveys Reintroduction to the wild Captive care
Conservation breeding
Diseases of lorises and pottos Behaviour General Info